Kofi Kingston Talks Backlash To “Black Excellence” Tweet, Origins Of The New Day

WWE Superstar Kofi Kingston was recently interviewed by former UFC Heavyweight Champion and New Japan Pro Wrestling announcer Josh Barnett for USA Today’s “For The Win” column.

During the interview, Kingston spoke about the origins of the popular New Day group, which has been one of the hotter acts in WWE over the past year or so.

“It was Woods’ brainchild to have three guys who were not really happy with their positions in the company. We joke about how he had like the worst debut of all time when he was R-Truth’s friend. R-Truth would say that’s my friend over there and then it was basically back to my match. He never got the chance to really shine. E was at a point in his career where he was having matches with Wade Barrett and they were giving Barrett all the mic time. He saw his career going in a certain way that happens all too often when you’re being kind of forgotten about. I was in the same boat. I wanted to switch things up. I’d been doing the same thing for a long time and getting on that stale pathway. I was approached by them because they were looking for a third guy with the idea of having three guys who were legitimately upset with where they are in the company at that point at time. I was immediately on board and wanted to do it.”

Additionally, the longtime WWE Superstar spoke about the backlash to the controversial “Black Excellence” tweet by his controversial New Day compadre’ Big E.

“I don’t think there has ever been a point in this company where there have been that many African-American champions. It’s a very important moment. Everyone knows the history of our nation. There was a point in time when this would have never happened. It means a lot to us to be the guys – and the woman – to be in the situation right now. It’s a testament to how far we’ve come. When you hear people talk about race, people all of a sudden get defensive. Well, if you would have put #WhiteExcellence there, you would have been run out of town and would have gotten banned and blah, blah, blah. It wasn’t about that … If someone wants to be proud of who they are, how far they’ve come and journey they’ve traveled then by all means. We’d be very, very supportive of it. That’s what we were trying to convey, not just us as a people but us a nation.”

Check out the complete Kofi Kingston interview by clicking here.